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Steampunk in Mainstream Media

The completion of most of the London Underground was in the early s. The English Channel Tunnel was originally considered since the early s and actually begun in There was a mile of tunnel completed on both sides before it was abandoned. James Harward, engineer of the Gibraltar Tunnel Railway Company, tries to warn his boss that the tunnel is too unsafe to open without success. How will they make it out alive? Jaubert, an engineer in real life, knew what could happen and describes it in exquisite and frightening detail.

A dollop of romance jacks up the danger while the reactions of both those on the train as well as the people waiting at the end of the tunnel are well displayed. Extraordinary story, exciting and well written. This is a writer who knew how to weave his professional knowledge into a story of great danger and adventure. First proposed in , it caught the imagination of writers and the public alike. In addition, the romance and adventure of polar exploration excited the general population.

Steampunk – Resources « Steampunk Family

Griffith, another writer who died relatively young due to excessive drinking and its effects, was the first major regular British writer of science fiction. In this tale, he combines the romance of discovery with that between two strong individuals willing to risk their lives for science.

Professor Haffkin proposed a trip through the center of the Earth to his friend and financial backer, Arthur Princeps, one that began at the South Pole and would reappear, if successful, at the North. More melodramatic than I expected. Space travel has been a prominent part of science fiction from the start, but after it was claimed that canals were discovered on Mars in , followed by book supporting that claim written by American astronomer Perceval Lowell beginning in , the interest among Victorians increased greatly.

This story, completed before H. Gerald Bemis volunteered to be put in suspended animation for two to three centuries after being disappointed in love. When he awakes in a new world, he is dealing with surprise after surprise, including the first visitor from Mars.

This is a case of too much research information put into the story. Standard speculative fiction that weaves romance, adventure, contact with superior aliens, and how the more things change with the hearts of men, the more they stay the same. There was an interesting section on how the large cities were abandoned or converted to green space due the reactions of people when jammed together.

The look at how people have developed and survived was an interesting tale that just needed some tighter editing. One book published in suggested that by the end of the 20th Century, one small group of wealthy, ruthless plutocrats rule the Earth through control of the governments or the press. One prolific writer was L. She collaborated with Robert Eustace Eustace Barton on this story, part of a series about Norman Head and Colin Dufrayer and their attempts to defeat the evil schemes of Madame Koluchy. Each story also focuses on a new technological or scientific discovery.

In this tale, published in , the story hinges on X-rays, just identified and studied in It comes out of the near paranoia of many in Britain over the possibility of an invasion from France or Germany and how unprepared they were. In fiction, it was invasion by aliens, most famously done by H. Wells in The War of the Worlds in Owen Oliver Joshua Flynn wrote many types of fiction, only a small percentage of which were science fiction. He focused on the various ways that Earth could be in danger.

Frank and his beloved Phyllis are caught up in a cascade of mysterious lights falling out of the sky and attaching to various humans. The lights appeared to be in pairs, wanting human couples if possible, but forcing a pairing if not. Wow, not what I expected when I began reading. Inventive, frightening, extremely well written and unusual. A nice mixture of science fiction, dystopian fiction, and romance. There is no clear explanation, which is probably even more realistic.

A seemingly abandoned ship is discovered and brought to Australia despite the logbook entries suggesting the boat could be infested with plague. Despite taking all due precautions, including torching the boat, it isn't long before illness and death spreads across the continent. The basic premise was interesting, but would've been better served as a longer story that could be greatly expanded. In short form, it seemed too rushed, too jumpy. This disaster tale reflects the growing concern of many regarding the over-reliance on modern technology.

A first person recollection of the great electrical disaster that occurred in London, killing hundreds through the appearance of green lightning and flames. The ensuing panic and efforts to escape death lead to even more dying. The results of people fleeing for their lives was well described.

There is no real explanation for the events described, just a report of how it started. Nor is the concern over genetic engineering. Inventor Herbert Bonsel discovered a way to make food and wine out of nitrogen pulled from the atmosphere. Within three years, there are no crops being naturally grown anywhere in the world. But some students in England worry about the consequences and try to warn those in authority. Ignored or ridiculed, they make their own plans for survival, warning their female counterparts from Vassar in America.

Unfortunately that hasn't really changed. Well developed story, could've been even longer.

Packard moves us far into the fourth millennium. Relations between Earth and Mercury are deteriorating into war. Although I do read some military science fiction, they are usually more character driven even in the midst of more technical story-telling. This is a recounting of the battles, focusing on the technical rather than the people. Wasn't too thrilled by it, sorry to say. Wallis jumps 13 million years into the future to tell the story of the last living man and woman on Earth.

Alwyn and Celia have watched their planet become colder and colder as the sun began to die. Now they know it is time to make the final escape. Not a happy tale by any means, but interesting nonetheless. Dedication and sacrifice, hope and despair, love and duty are all a part of this story.

Joanne Hargreaves, traveling by airship, is bemoaning the lack of real adventure and excitement in the modern world. She is surprised to meet author Dr. Norford Hale, a man who also finds the world lacking. Written in , twenty-one years before the Hindenburg disaster, this story relays some of what the passengers on that doomed airship must have seen and felt shortly before their death or lucky escape.

A tad preachy, it still resonates as a disaster and survival tale, even if the language used is dated. Feb 06, Alessandra rated it liked it Shelves: s , , science-fiction , steampunk , s. Steampunk Prime: A Vintage Steampunk Reader is an interesting and peculiar collection of futuristic science stories originally published between and The science is thoroughly Victorian, and the gazing into the future is startling in what it predicts and what it presumes.

I guess the first thing I have to say is that what the stories have in common is that The characters are generally thin, overblown Victorian stereotypes, the prose tends to be f Steampunk Prime: A Vintage Steampunk Reader is an interesting and peculiar collection of futuristic science stories originally published between and The characters are generally thin, overblown Victorian stereotypes, the prose tends to be florid, and few of the stories have much in the way of plot.

There are good bits here and there, but overall it's not first quality. However, the stories are fun reading for their insights into what people were thinking about and expecting a hundred years ago, and for musing on what sorts of things we might be missing in our thinking about our future.

In the future as foreseen in these stories there is no radio apart from one story's reference to reflected Marconi waves can't remember which one because, darn it, I didn't make a note of it. In George Parsons Lathrop's "In the Deep of Time," people use the ingenious arrangement of hundreds of miles of copper cable wound around a massive iron deposit in Wisconsin to make a giant interplanetary telegraph with which they communicate with Mars!

There aren't computers in any of these stories; those are a later dream.

Only one with this book???

A couple of stories involve making artificial food out of nitrogen vitamins were unknown at the time. In "Within an Ace of the End of the World" by Robert Barr, extraction of nitrogen from the atmosphere to make food depletes the atmosphere enough that everyone gets oxygen-drunk and silly, and civilization burns up.

bottlediggertom upcycling a vintage brass pulley steampunk lamp build

The idea that even with massive food production humans could make a dent in the Earth's atmospheric nitrogen content, let alone reverse its ratio to oxygen within five years, provoked giggles in my scientific friends. Meade really Elizabeth Thomasina Meade and Robert Eustace, an x-ray machine is used as a secret attempted murder weapon, set up next door and pointed at a man's bedroom, giving him massive doses of radiation. Owing to the lack of knowledge of the time, this makes him deadly ill but not anyone else, and he recovers afterwards, neither of which is very likely.

And all of the characters are as Victorian as can be the author Lathrop cites an African inventor, to his credit. All of which gets me musing about what casual assumptions we are making about what people of the future will be like, what they will be interested in, how they will live, what will be important and what will be disregarded. What will they, looking back at us, see clearly that we are blind to?

These stories were obviously transcribed using an optical scanner, as the typographical errors are the sort which occur with that method -- long dashes for short, and vice-versa and the odd very strange misspelling, such as "tire" instead of "the" and the surreal "M. View 1 comment. Nov 03, David Ledeboer rated it it was amazing. I could actually hear the full, long dresses swish against the railings of airships as these intrepid passengers sped along through the clouds.

I also trembled in fear along with the professor as he gazed at the misshapen, cobbled and furred automaton whirring in front of him. Had I been transported back or forward, far, far forward in time to an alternative Victorian world?

Why do we choose steampunk movies?

No, I had simply immersed myself in Steampunk Prime, a collection of short stories edited by Mike Ashley. I am certainly I could actually hear the full, long dresses swish against the railings of airships as these intrepid passengers sped along through the clouds. I am certainly a newbie when it comes to steampunk. Unbeknownst to me, apparently I have always been steampunk, before it ever became cool.

I swooned at the brilliant teeth and lean figure of actor Robert Conrad in the lead role and fell for the charm and gadgets of his brilliant sidekick played by actor Ross Martin. In Steampunk Prime, Ashley has gathered representatives of all of the perfect elements of this wild, wild genre. New marvelous inventions including machines, electricity, aircraft, aliens, world doom, world elation and even a bit of horror. The oldest story here was written in while the most recent, When the sizzle of electricity snaked its way into these authors homes and routine places of business, they could only marvel in wonder or recoil in trepidation.

They have given us such a unique view into how they saw the future of their world - where they imagined this industrial revolution might take them in or 13,, years in the future. Very well done. May 06, Richard rated it liked it. Great fun. There's a nice mix of stories here, from fantastic inventions to airship disasters to grand explorations into the unknown. Eagle Malvowley, I might have guessed it, the fiend! Actually, the whole thing works better than I thought it would Great fun.

Actually, the whole thing works better than I thought it would. Some are quick reads--breathless and giddy even--and some are harrowing in their way "What the Rats Brought". Jan 25, K. O'Bibliophile rated it liked it Shelves: anthology-shortstories. Bowden Snell, a graphist for the Hourly Flash, had just completed coverage of a swiftly solved crime when the son of an old friend comes to request help in finding his abducted wife.

The search reveals a surprise for Snell. Terribly hokey and over-the-top dramatic, this is unfortunately what most people expect from stories of this type and age. Victorians were involved in hundreds of construction and civil engineering projects, from the small to the large. The first underground railway in the world was completed in The completion of most of the London Underground was in the early s. The English Channel Tunnel was originally considered since the early s and actually begun in There was a mile of tunnel completed on both sides before it was abandoned.

James Harward, engineer of the Gibraltar Tunnel Railway Company, tries to warn his boss that the tunnel is too unsafe to open without success. How will they make it out alive? Jaubert, an engineer in real life, knew what could happen and describes it in exquisite and frightening detail. A dollop of romance jacks up the danger while the reactions of both those on the train as well as the people waiting at the end of the tunnel are well displayed.

Extraordinary story, exciting and well written. This is a writer who knew how to weave his professional knowledge into a story of great danger and adventure. First proposed in , it caught the imagination of writers and the public alike. In addition, the romance and adventure of polar exploration excited the general population.

Griffith, another writer who died relatively young due to excessive drinking and its effects, was the first major regular British writer of science fiction. In this tale, he combines the romance of discovery with that between two strong individuals willing to risk their lives for science. Professor Haffkin proposed a trip through the center of the Earth to his friend and financial backer, Arthur Princeps, one that began at the South Pole and would reappear, if successful, at the North.

More melodramatic than I expected. Space travel has been a prominent part of science fiction from the start, but after it was claimed that canals were discovered on Mars in , followed by book supporting that claim written by American astronomer Perceval Lowell beginning in , the interest among Victorians increased greatly. This story, completed before H. Gerald Bemis volunteered to be put in suspended animation for two to three centuries after being disappointed in love. When he awakes in a new world, he is dealing with surprise after surprise, including the first visitor from Mars.

ISBN 13: 9781933065182

This is a case of too much research information put into the story. Standard speculative fiction that weaves romance, adventure, contact with superior aliens, and how the more things change with the hearts of men, the more they stay the same. There was an interesting section on how the large cities were abandoned or converted to green space due the reactions of people when jammed together.

The look at how people have developed and survived was an interesting tale that just needed some tighter editing. One book published in suggested that by the end of the 20th Century, one small group of wealthy, ruthless plutocrats rule the Earth through control of the governments or the press. One prolific writer was L. She collaborated with Robert Eustace Eustace Barton on this story, part of a series about Norman Head and Colin Dufrayer and their attempts to defeat the evil schemes of Madame Koluchy.

Each story also focuses on a new technological or scientific discovery. In this tale, published in , the story hinges on X-rays, just identified and studied in It comes out of the near paranoia of many in Britain over the possibility of an invasion from France or Germany and how unprepared they were. In fiction, it was invasion by aliens, most famously done by H.

Wells in The War of the Worlds in Owen Oliver Joshua Flynn wrote many types of fiction, only a small percentage of which were science fiction. He focused on the various ways that Earth could be in danger. Frank and his beloved Phyllis are caught up in a cascade of mysterious lights falling out of the sky and attaching to various humans. The lights appeared to be in pairs, wanting human couples if possible, but forcing a pairing if not.

Wow, not what I expected when I began reading. Inventive, frightening, extremely well written and unusual.

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A nice mixture of science fiction, dystopian fiction, and romance. There is no clear explanation, which is probably even more realistic. A seemingly abandoned ship is discovered and brought to Australia despite the logbook entries suggesting the boat could be infested with plague. Despite taking all due precautions, including torching the boat, it isn't long before illness and death spreads across the continent. The basic premise was interesting, but would've been better served as a longer story that could be greatly expanded. In short form, it seemed too rushed, too jumpy.

This disaster tale reflects the growing concern of many regarding the over-reliance on modern technology. A first person recollection of the great electrical disaster that occurred in London, killing hundreds through the appearance of green lightning and flames. The ensuing panic and efforts to escape death lead to even more dying. The results of people fleeing for their lives was well described. There is no real explanation for the events described, just a report of how it started.


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Nor is the concern over genetic engineering. Inventor Herbert Bonsel discovered a way to make food and wine out of nitrogen pulled from the atmosphere. Within three years, there are no crops being naturally grown anywhere in the world. But some students in England worry about the consequences and try to warn those in authority.

Ignored or ridiculed, they make their own plans for survival, warning their female counterparts from Vassar in America. Unfortunately that hasn't really changed. Well developed story, could've been even longer. Packard moves us far into the fourth millennium. Relations between Earth and Mercury are deteriorating into war. Although I do read some military science fiction, they are usually more character driven even in the midst of more technical story-telling. This is a recounting of the battles, focusing on the technical rather than the people.

Wasn't too thrilled by it, sorry to say. Wallis jumps 13 million years into the future to tell the story of the last living man and woman on Earth. Alwyn and Celia have watched their planet become colder and colder as the sun began to die. Now they know it is time to make the final escape. Not a happy tale by any means, but interesting nonetheless. Dedication and sacrifice, hope and despair, love and duty are all a part of this story. Joanne Hargreaves, traveling by airship, is bemoaning the lack of real adventure and excitement in the modern world.

She is surprised to meet author Dr. Norford Hale, a man who also finds the world lacking. Written in , twenty-one years before the Hindenburg disaster, this story relays some of what the passengers on that doomed airship must have seen and felt shortly before their death or lucky escape. A tad preachy, it still resonates as a disaster and survival tale, even if the language used is dated.

Feb 06, Alessandra rated it liked it Shelves: science-fiction , steampunk , , s , s. Steampunk Prime: A Vintage Steampunk Reader is an interesting and peculiar collection of futuristic science stories originally published between and The science is thoroughly Victorian, and the gazing into the future is startling in what it predicts and what it presumes. I guess the first thing I have to say is that what the stories have in common is that The characters are generally thin, overblown Victorian stereotypes, the prose tends to be f Steampunk Prime: A Vintage Steampunk Reader is an interesting and peculiar collection of futuristic science stories originally published between and The characters are generally thin, overblown Victorian stereotypes, the prose tends to be florid, and few of the stories have much in the way of plot.

There are good bits here and there, but overall it's not first quality. However, the stories are fun reading for their insights into what people were thinking about and expecting a hundred years ago, and for musing on what sorts of things we might be missing in our thinking about our future. In the future as foreseen in these stories there is no radio apart from one story's reference to reflected Marconi waves can't remember which one because, darn it, I didn't make a note of it.

In George Parsons Lathrop's "In the Deep of Time," people use the ingenious arrangement of hundreds of miles of copper cable wound around a massive iron deposit in Wisconsin to make a giant interplanetary telegraph with which they communicate with Mars! There aren't computers in any of these stories; those are a later dream. A couple of stories involve making artificial food out of nitrogen vitamins were unknown at the time. In "Within an Ace of the End of the World" by Robert Barr, extraction of nitrogen from the atmosphere to make food depletes the atmosphere enough that everyone gets oxygen-drunk and silly, and civilization burns up.

The idea that even with massive food production humans could make a dent in the Earth's atmospheric nitrogen content, let alone reverse its ratio to oxygen within five years, provoked giggles in my scientific friends. Meade really Elizabeth Thomasina Meade and Robert Eustace, an x-ray machine is used as a secret attempted murder weapon, set up next door and pointed at a man's bedroom, giving him massive doses of radiation. Owing to the lack of knowledge of the time, this makes him deadly ill but not anyone else, and he recovers afterwards, neither of which is very likely. And all of the characters are as Victorian as can be the author Lathrop cites an African inventor, to his credit.

All of which gets me musing about what casual assumptions we are making about what people of the future will be like, what they will be interested in, how they will live, what will be important and what will be disregarded. What will they, looking back at us, see clearly that we are blind to? These stories were obviously transcribed using an optical scanner, as the typographical errors are the sort which occur with that method -- long dashes for short, and vice-versa and the odd very strange misspelling, such as "tire" instead of "the" and the surreal "M.

View 1 comment. Nov 03, David Ledeboer rated it it was amazing. I could actually hear the full, long dresses swish against the railings of airships as these intrepid passengers sped along through the clouds. I also trembled in fear along with the professor as he gazed at the misshapen, cobbled and furred automaton whirring in front of him. Had I been transported back or forward, far, far forward in time to an alternative Victorian world?

No, I had simply immersed myself in Steampunk Prime, a collection of short stories edited by Mike Ashley. I am certainly I could actually hear the full, long dresses swish against the railings of airships as these intrepid passengers sped along through the clouds. I am certainly a newbie when it comes to steampunk. Unbeknownst to me, apparently I have always been steampunk, before it ever became cool.

I swooned at the brilliant teeth and lean figure of actor Robert Conrad in the lead role and fell for the charm and gadgets of his brilliant sidekick played by actor Ross Martin. In Steampunk Prime, Ashley has gathered representatives of all of the perfect elements of this wild, wild genre.

New marvelous inventions including machines, electricity, aircraft, aliens, world doom, world elation and even a bit of horror. The oldest story here was written in while the most recent, When the sizzle of electricity snaked its way into these authors homes and routine places of business, they could only marvel in wonder or recoil in trepidation. They have given us such a unique view into how they saw the future of their world - where they imagined this industrial revolution might take them in or 13,, years in the future.

Very well done. May 06, Richard rated it liked it. Great fun. There's a nice mix of stories here, from fantastic inventions to airship disasters to grand explorations into the unknown. Eagle Malvowley, I might have guessed it, the fiend! Actually, the whole thing works better than I thought it would Great fun. He determines to reveal the players for what they really are.

With a surprising ending, the story unfolds at a good clip and keeps the reader interested from start to finish. As he learns the details, he begins to suspect the girl has a special relationship to himself and the two set about to rescue her. Well written, I still found this one a little rushed. I thought the story reached its conclusion a little quickly, wrapping complicated matters up a bit too neatly with too little effort.

Still, an enjoyable read. Also on board is a woman he loves. When his fears become realized and the train is put in danger, Harward acts heroically to save the train and his love. Well written, compelling, the story reminds me of many action movies, including the recent Unstoppable. Thoroughly enjoyable. The three together embark on a harrowing adventure. Well paced, with interesting science and characters, this story is a good read and entertaining. Lathrop, the son-in-law of Nathaniel Hawthorne, spins the tale of Gerald Bemis, a young 19th Century man, who is frozen inside a cylinder coated with collodion and hermetically sealed, preserved until his extraction in the 22nd Century.

Upon his arrival, he discovers that the girl he pined after was also preserved and has fallen for him. Unfortunately, he takes more of an interest in Electra, ward of one of the Three, leaders of the experiment. Soon thereafter, the first visitor from Mars arrives, and they embark together on a journey to rediscover the Earth. This story, although certainly ambitious and interesting with its future view, felt a bit unfocused to me. It seemed to start out as a story about one thing and wind up a story about another.